A Crash Course in the History of Film Trailers

David Fear wrote an amazing piece for “The Dissolve” earlier this week. In his article he discusses the history of movie trailers and its evolution. Fear points out several key elements to making trailers and how they have turned into an industry of its own within the film industry and a main, if not the main, pillar of a film’s marketing campaign.

Fear lays out the history of trailers by looking at 10 movie-trailer milestones; The Jazz Singer (1927), The Grapes of Wrath (1940), Pyscho (1960), Dr. Strangelove (1964), Gunfighters of Casa Grande (1964), Jaws (1975), The Shinning (1980), Independence Day (1996), Star Wars: Episode I – The Phantom Menace (1999), and Cloverfield (2008).

The evolution is clear and the differences are jarring. Fear at one point even says, “When trailers started, their goal was to make sure the film’s name was on everyone’s lips. This ad [Cloverfield] proved that so long as filmmakers could get people talking about their movie, they didn’t even need a name.”

Filmmakers will always find a way to get more and more innovative with their trailers and push the envelopes with their film’s marketing campaigns! With the advance of technology there will always be someone doing something new and different with their trailers, and at this point if you don’t join the movement the audience will leave you behind. In Hollywood’s over saturated film market, the consumer holds all the power and most filmmakers are forced to obey to the audience’s every desire.

Of the trailers he discusses which one is your favorite? Do you think these innovations are just gimmicks filmmakers can use to cover up specific elements of their movies? Let us know what you think in the comments section below. And make sure to check our David Fear’s full article here:

David Fear wrote an amazing piece for “The Dissolve” earlier this week. In his article he discusses the history of movie trailers and its evolution. Fear points out several key elements to making trailers and how they have turned into an industry of its own within the film industry and a main, if not the main, pillar of a film’s marketing campaign.

Fear lays out the history of trailers by looking at 10 movie-trailer milestones; The Jazz Singer (1927), The Grapes of Wrath (1940), Pyscho (1960), Dr. Strangelove (1964), Gunfighters of Casa Grande (1964), Jaws (1975), The Shinning (1980), Independence Day (1996), Star Wars: Episode I – The Phantom Menace (1999), and Cloverfield (2008).

The evolution is clear and the differences are jarring. Fear at one point even says, “When trailers started, their goal was to make sure the film’s name was on everyone’s lips. This ad [Cloverfield] proved that so long as filmmakers could get people talking about their movie, they didn’t even need a name.”

Filmmakers will always find a way to get more and more innovative with their trailers and push the envelopes with their film’s marketing campaigns! With the advance of technology there will always be someone doing something new and different with their trailers, and at this point if you don’t join the movement the audience will leave you behind. In Hollywood’s over saturated film market, the consumer holds all the power and most filmmakers are forced to obey to the audience’s every desire.

Of the trailers he discusses which one is your favorite? Do you think these innovations are just gimmicks filmmakers can use to cover up specific elements of their movies? Let us know what you think in the comments section below. And make sure to check our David Fear’s full article here: http://bit.ly/1f7cGM0

 

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