Obama Screened “Mandela: Long Walk to Freedom” in White House

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Forthcoming biopic “Mandela: Long Walk to Freedom” has been generating a lot of buzz lately…the words “Oscar” have definitely been thrown around the last couple of day. And Mandela’s biopic is getting more buzz as President Barack Obama has set a date to host a special White House screening.

This biopic chronicles Nelson Mandela’s early years, from his childhood in a rural village to being chosen as the first democratically elected president in South Africa. The film is backed up by Harvey Weinstein and stars Idris Elba as Mandela.

On Monday, Weinstein commended Obama, “Knowing what a strong relationship President Obama has with President Mandela, it’s an honor for this film to be shown at the White House.”

The film opens on Thanksgiving weekend on the 29th of this month. What do you guys think? Will you go watch it?

A Crash Course in the History of Film Trailers

David Fear wrote an amazing piece for “The Dissolve” earlier this week. In his article he discusses the history of movie trailers and its evolution. Fear points out several key elements to making trailers and how they have turned into an industry of its own within the film industry and a main, if not the main, pillar of a film’s marketing campaign.

Fear lays out the history of trailers by looking at 10 movie-trailer milestones; The Jazz Singer (1927), The Grapes of Wrath (1940), Pyscho (1960), Dr. Strangelove (1964), Gunfighters of Casa Grande (1964), Jaws (1975), The Shinning (1980), Independence Day (1996), Star Wars: Episode I – The Phantom Menace (1999), and Cloverfield (2008).

The evolution is clear and the differences are jarring. Fear at one point even says, “When trailers started, their goal was to make sure the film’s name was on everyone’s lips. This ad [Cloverfield] proved that so long as filmmakers could get people talking about their movie, they didn’t even need a name.”

Filmmakers will always find a way to get more and more innovative with their trailers and push the envelopes with their film’s marketing campaigns! With the advance of technology there will always be someone doing something new and different with their trailers, and at this point if you don’t join the movement the audience will leave you behind. In Hollywood’s over saturated film market, the consumer holds all the power and most filmmakers are forced to obey to the audience’s every desire.

Of the trailers he discusses which one is your favorite? Do you think these innovations are just gimmicks filmmakers can use to cover up specific elements of their movies? Let us know what you think in the comments section below. And make sure to check our David Fear’s full article here:

David Fear wrote an amazing piece for “The Dissolve” earlier this week. In his article he discusses the history of movie trailers and its evolution. Fear points out several key elements to making trailers and how they have turned into an industry of its own within the film industry and a main, if not the main, pillar of a film’s marketing campaign.

Fear lays out the history of trailers by looking at 10 movie-trailer milestones; The Jazz Singer (1927), The Grapes of Wrath (1940), Pyscho (1960), Dr. Strangelove (1964), Gunfighters of Casa Grande (1964), Jaws (1975), The Shinning (1980), Independence Day (1996), Star Wars: Episode I – The Phantom Menace (1999), and Cloverfield (2008).

The evolution is clear and the differences are jarring. Fear at one point even says, “When trailers started, their goal was to make sure the film’s name was on everyone’s lips. This ad [Cloverfield] proved that so long as filmmakers could get people talking about their movie, they didn’t even need a name.”

Filmmakers will always find a way to get more and more innovative with their trailers and push the envelopes with their film’s marketing campaigns! With the advance of technology there will always be someone doing something new and different with their trailers, and at this point if you don’t join the movement the audience will leave you behind. In Hollywood’s over saturated film market, the consumer holds all the power and most filmmakers are forced to obey to the audience’s every desire.

Of the trailers he discusses which one is your favorite? Do you think these innovations are just gimmicks filmmakers can use to cover up specific elements of their movies? Let us know what you think in the comments section below. And make sure to check our David Fear’s full article here: http://bit.ly/1f7cGM0

 

Starbucks.. Pay it forward.

We all know Starbucks is the biggest and baddest coffee shop in the world, but why is that they are so successful? Not just because they can make a mean pumpkin spice soy extra hot latte, but because they are run by people with some common sense and honorable intentions! And of course, there is no coincidence that it comes during the time of the government shut down….
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In case you haven’t heard about it yet, they are currently running a special this week based around “paying it forward.” CEO and president of Starbucks Howard Schultz decided to encourage lawmakers to come together during uncertain by offering free coffee to customers.
In “this seemingly unending cycle of dysfunction and doubt,” Schultz announced that Starbucks’ customers could buy “someone else their favorite beverage” and get a free tall brewed coffee in return from Wednesday through Friday of this week.
This sense of paying it forward allows people to find a little bit of comfort in these uncertain times. A nice little boost of confidence in humanity and common decency.
Paying it forward for is a little something that an individual can do to make someones day, but in the end, it makes your day too. How about taking this Starbucks paying it forward mentally and implement it into your day. May just change how you feel about the little things…

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Movies For Mother’s Day

Mother’s Day comes once a year, but we can celebrate motherhood and the wonderful things that mothers do every day by honoring the creativity and strength of remarkable women. This is a list of documentaries about great women — mothers, teachers and entertainers — who have nurtured, inspired and enriched the lives of others.

 An Encounter With Simone Weil

Line Street Productions
Filmmaker Julia Haslett’s interest in Simone Weil was prompted by a quote by the French philosopher: “Attention is the rarest and purest form of generosity.” The quote is the central premise for Haslett’s broader consideration of Weil’s notions about the nature of compassion, the subject of this compassionate documentary based on six years of research and consideration of Weil’s writings.

 Gloria In Her Own Words

HBO Documentaries
A documentary profile and tribute film to feminist Gloria Steinem, the famous founder of Ms. Magazine and a leading proponant of women’s equal rights, with on camera interviews with Steinem, Bella Abzug and others in Steinem’s circle of influential friends.

The Arbor

Artangel Media
Clio Bernard tells the story of British playwright Andrea Dunbar’s troubled life in an English working class ‘estate’ (housing project) by using actors on camera to mouth the testimony given by Dunbar’s family and friends on audio tape. The film is a fascinating, and very moving profile of an extremely talented woman who suffered the results of poverty.

 The Ballad of Genesis and Lady Jaye

Adopt Films
Filmmaker Marie Losier chronicles the relationship between performance artists Genesis P’Orrige (nee Neil Andrew Megson) and his wife and creative partner Lady Jaye (nee Jacqueline Breyer), whose love for each other lead them to get plastic surgery so they would look as much alike as possible.

 Ballerina

First Run Feaures
French filmmaker Bertrand Norman follows the careers of five Russian ballerinas, giving an insider glimpse of the extreme discipline and dedication demanded of women who dance at the famed Kirov Ballet.
For more information about these films and the complete list of documentaries, please visit: http://documentaries.about.com/od/populardocsubjects/tp/Mothers_Day_Documentaries.htm